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Keyboard / Piano
Author: fantanoice, Views: 7362, Replies: 35

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#11
(02-19-2014, 04:17 PM)crazysam23 Wrote: So...you mean, arpeggios?
After looking up the actual, english definition, yes, yes I do. I also apparently mean broken chords, so hah!, hypothetical person who disagreed with me.

It's just that I've seen the term arpeggio used to imply different, similar things in different contexts, so I'm careful with using it.
Don't call Adam a jew. He can't hear you. 3:
(02-12-2014, 12:07 AM)Mr Maps Wrote: The happiest squeals of my life. ;_;
Now he's squealing no more. ;____;
Please return to us, Adam
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#12
I don't even know what a broken chord is. D:
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You wouldn't check it out B)
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#13
(02-19-2014, 05:16 PM)fantanoice Wrote: I don't even know what a broken chord is. D:
Wikipedia explains it pretty well.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arpeggio

(02-19-2014, 04:26 PM)ln cognition Wrote:
(02-19-2014, 04:17 PM)crazysam23 Wrote: So...you mean, arpeggios?
After looking up the actual, english definition, yes, yes I do. I also apparently mean broken chords, so hah!, hypothetical person who disagreed with me.

It's just that I've seen the term arpeggio used to imply different, similar things in different contexts, so I'm careful with using it.
No, they're actually the same thing. (See the wiki.)
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#14
Oh cool, I learnt a thing
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You wouldn't check it out B)
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#15
(02-19-2014, 05:20 PM)crazysam23 Wrote: No, they're actually the same thing. (See the wiki.)
Actually, no they aren't, and no, I didn't mean arpeggios. Ha. :p (I'm only being obnoxious atm because I'm all in all a terrible human being my recollection of music-theory is so bad I couldn't even articulate an actual point I was gonna make. Also because I'm not sure if I can spell obnoxious)

Arpeggios are a subset of broken chords were the notes are played in sequence. Much of the fun in broken chords is that they aren't necessarily arpeggios, you can mess around with the sequence of the notes and which ones to include.
Don't call Adam a jew. He can't hear you. 3:
(02-12-2014, 12:07 AM)Mr Maps Wrote: The happiest squeals of my life. ;_;
Now he's squealing no more. ;____;
Please return to us, Adam
Reply
#16
(02-19-2014, 04:26 PM)ln cognition Wrote:
(02-19-2014, 04:17 PM)crazysam23 Wrote: So...you mean, arpeggios?
After looking up the actual, english definition, yes, yes I do. I also apparently mean broken chords, so hah!, hypothetical person who disagreed with me.

It's just that I've seen the term arpeggio used to imply different, similar things in different contexts, so I'm careful with using it.

(02-19-2014, 08:21 PM)ln cognition Wrote:
(02-19-2014, 05:20 PM)crazysam23 Wrote: No, they're actually the same thing. (See the wiki.)
Actually, no they aren't, and no, I didn't mean arpeggios. Ha. :p (I'm only being obnoxious atm because I'm all in all a terrible human being my recollection of music-theory is so bad I couldn't even articulate an actual point I was gonna make. Also because I'm not sure if I can spell obnoxious)

Arpeggios are a subset of broken chords were the notes are played in sequence. Much of the fun in broken chords is that they aren't necessarily arpeggios, you can mess around with the sequence of the notes and which ones to include.
Wait...are you talking about non-complete chords? I really think you need to define what a broken chord is to you. Because every time I've heard the term "broken chord", it refers to an arpeggio.
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#17
(02-19-2014, 10:18 PM)crazysam23 Wrote: Wait...are you talking about non-complete chords? I really think you need to define what a broken chord is to you. Because every time I've heard the term "broken chord", it refers to an arpeggio.
I'm not talking about what it means to me anymore, but how it's defined in the link you posted.
Wikipedia Wrote:An arpeggio is a type of broken chord. Other types of broken chords play chord notes out of sequence or more than one note but less than the full chord simultaneously. Arpeggios can rise or fall for more than one octave
Although the part about non-completeness might have been on my part. >__>
Don't call Adam a jew. He can't hear you. 3:
(02-12-2014, 12:07 AM)Mr Maps Wrote: The happiest squeals of my life. ;_;
Now he's squealing no more. ;____;
Please return to us, Adam
Reply
#18
(02-19-2014, 10:21 PM)ln cognition Wrote:
(02-19-2014, 10:18 PM)crazysam23 Wrote: Wait...are you talking about non-complete chords? I really think you need to define what a broken chord is to you. Because every time I've heard the term "broken chord", it refers to an arpeggio.
I'm not talking about what it means to me anymore, but how it's defined in the link you posted.
Wikipedia Wrote:An arpeggio is a type of broken chord. Other types of broken chords play chord notes out of sequence or more than one note but less than the full chord simultaneously. Arpeggios can rise or fall for more than one octave
Although the part about non-completeness might have been on my part. >__>
I thought later about how you might mean that. In my mind, though, that still would be a form of arpeggio. It's just not a "standard" arpeggio. So...if I played:
Code:
e-------3-
b-----0---
g---0-----
d-3-------
a-x-------
e-3-------

That's still an arpeggio sequence to me. And that kind of thing is fairly common on guitar. Piano players do similar things at times. If one wanted, I suppose this could be unofficially called a "partial arpeggio". Confusedhrug:
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#19
How about "non-sequential arpeggio"?

But seriously, I don't really find terminology as important as communication. It's just that I don't really want to say something wrong either. People get what you mean when you say arpeggio, even if it's not in accordance with the site you use to justify your use of that term, so there's no problem as people get what you mean.

Although, to be honest, I'm more bothered by the g and f harmonizing in the first stroke than the notes not necessarily being in sequence. That's just un-arpeggioy. >__>

Much of my uncertainty on how to use the term actually originate in how guitarists and pianists play it kinda differently. Can't remember what the difference actually was, though, only that when we went through arpeggios in class, every single guitarist went "wait, that's not precisely how we do it".
Which only goes to show that guitarists are terrible musicians. :face-face:
Don't call Adam a jew. He can't hear you. 3:
(02-12-2014, 12:07 AM)Mr Maps Wrote: The happiest squeals of my life. ;_;
Now he's squealing no more. ;____;
Please return to us, Adam
Reply
#20
Well almost all guitar chords are inversions of one kind or another, so the way a guitarist thinks about chords is just different. And you could either say that playing the notes of a standard chord in order of strings is an arpeggio, or you could mean playing the notes in the order that they fall in a scale, which is many cases mean you can't just hold the chord for guitar.
(02-20-2014, 10:10 PM)Mr Maps Wrote: ...me folky-doodles... ya sinister glogmojens?
You cotton-moist brickabrackers.


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