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Music theory assistance
Author: Adam, Views: 12504, Replies: 53

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#11
(04-09-2013, 12:06 AM)ln cognition Wrote: I'm sorry that all the other members of this site are plebs, Adam. I'll help keep this thread on topic.
Yeah, we're all plebs, Adam. Deal with it.

(04-09-2013, 12:06 AM)ln cognition Wrote: Which key is the best key?
ooh ohh ooh, I know this one! It's obviously the key to my heart :3

(04-09-2013, 09:50 AM)Mr Maps Wrote: Fine. I'll be on topic. Nigger, how do you form the different seventh chords from major, and what's the difference between each type?
In all srsness, a seventh chord of any type differs from a major or minor in that it necessarily has at least four notes (I-III-V-VII) rather than a triad (I-III-V).

A regular seventh chord is tonic, major third, perfect fifth and diminished subtonic. In other words, I-III-V-VIIo. G-B-D-F would be a 7th chord.

A major 7th (not the same) would be tonic, major third, perfect fifth and diminished octave. This would be I-III-V-Io. In the key of G, this would be G-B-D-Gb.

Finally, a minor 7th would be tonic, minor third, perfect fifth and diminished subtonic. This would be I-iii-V-VIIo. In the key of G, this would be G-Bb-D-F.

Note that it's more common to play a chord as I-V-VII-III rather than the value in order of size on guitar, which is essentially a major chord without the root's octave, instead replaced with a diminished 7th. If that makes any sense. As such, played on guitar, a regular 7th would be G-D-F-B, a major 7th would be G-D-Gb-B, and a minor 7th would be G-D-F-Bb.
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#12
Danke Wolfy.
JoelCarli Wrote:Well curiosity killed the Maps.

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#13
Prego.
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#14
(04-09-2013, 12:01 PM)JoelCarli Wrote:
(04-09-2013, 09:50 AM)Mr Maps Wrote: Fine. I'll be on topic. Nigger, how do you form the different seventh chords from major, and what's the difference between each type?
In all srsness, a seventh chord of any type differs from a major or minor in that it necessarily has at least four notes (I-III-V-VII) rather than a triad (I-III-V).

A regular seventh chord is tonic, major third, perfect fifth and diminished subtonic. In other words, I-III-V-VIIo. G-B-D-F would be a 7th chord.

A major 7th (not the same) would be tonic, major third, perfect fifth and diminished octave. This would be I-III-V-Io. In the key of G, this would be G-B-D-Gb.

Finally, a minor 7th would be tonic, minor third, perfect fifth and diminished subtonic. This would be I-iii-V-VIIo. In the key of G, this would be G-Bb-D-F.

Note that it's more common to play a chord as I-V-VII-III rather than the value in order of size on guitar, which is essentially a major chord without the root's octave, instead replaced with a diminished 7th. If that makes any sense. As such, played on guitar, a regular 7th would be G-D-F-B, a major 7th would be G-D-Gb-B, and a minor 7th would be G-D-F-Bb.

I'd just like to correct a few things

When you say a 'regular' seventh chord, you mean dominant seventh.
It's not a good idea to say subtonic to people who don't know much theory, it can get confusing, just say seventh.
Plus there's no such thing as a 'diminished octave', it's a Major seventh.

Besides that good post and thanks for finally helping do good :3
Obscene Wrote:babe why is there an israeli sleeping under the bed?

Grungie Wrote:Great, more brown people

Apparently i like platypuses.


nigga you be trippin'

you like platypussy
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#15
To be fair, I do know about tonics and subtonics and whatnot. I have read a book on basic theory, I just can't get it to stick in my mind. Confusedhrug:
JoelCarli Wrote:Well curiosity killed the Maps.

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#16
Hey, my post was about the music theory of hardcore music.

And to be more guitar specific than those guys, if you're playing an A or A type barre chord, you change the middle note (the one on the G string) and lower it 1 or 2 frets, depending on the key. This works for both major and minor chords. One of them is a major seventh relative to the chord and the other is a minor. But the fun thing about 7ths is that you can probably get away with playing either or both, depending on how jazzy you feel like being.

For E and E type barre chords (does it really matter if you spell it barre or bar?) You want to fret the B string on either the 3rd or 4th fret (relative to your bar, if you're barring.)

For D and D type barre its very similar to A type chords, but a string up, so you take the note on the B string and move it down one or two frets.

Yall niggahs can correct my shit if I'm making some musical error, but I know those notes are major and minor sevenths relative to the chords, and also that they sound fine, so IDGAF.
(02-20-2014, 10:10 PM)Mr Maps Wrote: ...me folky-doodles... ya sinister glogmojens?
You cotton-moist brickabrackers.


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#17
(04-09-2013, 03:54 PM)Mr Maps Wrote: To be fair, I do know about tonics and subtonics and whatnot. I have read a book on basic theory, I just can't get it to stick in my mind. Confusedhrug:

Tonic = root note. For instance the tonic of the C major chord is C.
Subtonic = 1 note (halfstep - single fret on your guitar) below tonic. B is subtonic to C
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#18
(04-09-2013, 03:27 PM)Adam Wrote: I'd just like to correct a few things
Somehow I knew I'd fucked up somewhere :lol:

(04-09-2013, 03:27 PM)Adam Wrote: When you say a 'regular' seventh chord, you mean dominant seventh.
It's not a good idea to say subtonic to people who don't know much theory, it can get confusing, just say seventh.
Plus there's no such thing as a 'diminished octave', it's a Major seventh.
Yeah, that's why I specified that a subtonic in a regular 7-tone scale was the seventh (which it isn't always). But you're right, dominant seventh chord, but I'm used to just "seventh chord".

I know there's technically no diminished octave, but I'm just being extraordinarily pedantic just in case things weren't clear Tongue

(04-09-2013, 03:27 PM)Adam Wrote: Besides that good post and thanks for finally helping do good :3
colon-three indeed :3

(04-09-2013, 04:43 PM)debbie Wrote: Tonic = root note. For instance the tonic of the C major chord is C.
Subtonic = 1 note (halfstep - single fret on your guitar) below tonic. B is subtonic to C
And to be even more meticulous:

Tonic - I
Supertonic - II
Mediant - III (the love happening in between the tonic and the dominant. Good love = major, bad love = minor)
Subdominant - IV
Dominant - V (the dominatrix of the tonic. rawr.)
Submediant (or Superdominant) - VI
Subtonic - VII

Now these notes WILL vary depending on the scale, and some might not be even present in some other scales (such as pentatonic scales, including eastern ones such as the sexy hirajoshi and iwata). Conversely, there are some scales with more notes than standard ones as well (whole-tone scale, quarter-tone scale).
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#19
(04-09-2013, 04:26 PM)Danjo Wrote: Hey, my post was about the music theory of hardcore music.

And to be more guitar specific than those guys, if you're playing an A or A type barre chord, you change the middle note (the one on the G string) and lower it 1 or 2 frets, depending on the key. This works for both major and minor chords. One of them is a major seventh relative to the chord and the other is a minor. But the fun thing about 7ths is that you can probably get away with playing either or both, depending on how jazzy you feel like being.

For E and E type barre chords (does it really matter if you spell it barre or bar?) You want to fret the B string on either the 3rd or 4th fret (relative to your bar, if you're barring.)

For D and D type barre its very similar to A type chords, but a string up, so you take the note on the B string and move it down one or two frets.

Yall niggahs can correct my shit if I'm making some musical error, but I know those notes are major and minor sevenths relative to the chords, and also that they sound fine, so IDGAF.

Thanks, but this actually confuses me more. If I get the way something is made (i.e. the subtonic is raised by a semitone in a Natural Minor to make it Harmonic etc), I can apply that to whatever, rather than learning patterns. It's the same with scales, I'd rather work out a scale based on the intervals, rather than just learn a pattern.

(04-09-2013, 04:43 PM)debbie Wrote:
(04-09-2013, 03:54 PM)Mr Maps Wrote: To be fair, I do know about tonics and subtonics and whatnot. I have read a book on basic theory, I just can't get it to stick in my mind. Confusedhrug:

Tonic = root note. For instance the tonic of the C major chord is C.
Subtonic = 1 note (halfstep - single fret on your guitar) below tonic. B is subtonic to C

Yeah I know, that's what I'm saying - I know that already. Tongue

And I know my major and minor scale intervals, as well as pentatonic.
JoelCarli Wrote:Well curiosity killed the Maps.

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#20
So, chord substitutions anyone?...
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